Picked Electric Guitar

  • 32 semi-tones sampled
  • 7 random round-robins per sampled note
  • Sustain length ranges from 4 to 20 seconds
  • 32 bit, 44.1 khz WAV samples
  • 224 samples total

This is a picked electric guitar and recorded direct (dry). Each of the 32 semi-tones are sampled with 7 random round-robins. There is only one velocity layer (0-128) but velocity controls volume so you can strum quieter as well as louder passages. The instrument is provided this way so that strumming the guitar sounds as realistic and practical as possible – it provides a rich and dynamic texture even as you strum the same chord. You can simulate upstrokes and downstrokes in your midi track by staggering the timings of the notes of the chords. Finally, the power and realism of this instrument can be exploited by outputting it through your own plug-ins and FX like overdrive, cabinet/mic emulations, EQ, reverb and many more (not included). Your friends may demand to know who was your rhythm guitarist in any track that features this instrument!

Try generating MIDI guitar strumming with “Key Chords” (not associated with SampleSoundBank.com)

The strings are struck in a way that emulates how the string is struck when the guitar is strummed with a pick. You can create upstroke and downstroke patterns in your midi track by staggering the notes through time. For example, the downstroke plays the lowest notes first, while the upstroke plays the notes in the chord from the highest to the lowest.

This sampled instrument is only composed of single note samples: no strummed chords were recorded but the effect of chord playing is simulated by playing more than one note together as in strumming patterns. As may be audible in the audio demo, each note of this instrument may not be perfectly in tune, but we believe this makes the instrument more authentic (i.e. makes it rock more!)

range-picked-electric

This instrument is an “SFZ instrument” which is a free, cross-platform sampler format for virtual instruments (musical instruments played by computer software). The instrument is composed of a .SFZ file which points to a collection of audio samples. The SFZ file tells the sampler how to perform the notes when they are triggered by MIDI in a digital audio workstation; in other words, when you play a note, the SFZ file tells the sampler which audio files to play. Cakewalk has a free SFZ player but the one SampleSoundBank prefers is Plogue’s Sforzando.

Downloads coming soon!